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Heating Radiantly

Photo Source: Ask the Builder

Invisible electromagnetic infrared waves are the ones responsible for radiant heat to provide us with the amount of heat we want or need. Contrary to other ways of heating, such as electric pumps, radiant heat systems do not need the heat in the air. Items closest to the infrared rays absorb the radiant heat energy almost immediately. As they absorb the energy, they heat up and radiate heat to other items close to them.  In time, the whole room is warm.

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The efficacy of radiant heating systems is that it transfers heat from the source where the system is set up in, whether it is from the floor up to the ceiling, and directly to the people and objects that are in the line of target of the heater. It uses elements to evenly spread heat into the surroundings.

An advantage this type of heating system has is that it does not give out dust or allergens because it takes away duct losses. It is much more efficient than other heating systems due to the way heat is distributed and unlike other heaters, this type of system does not heat up air, it has many more characteristics and how it effectively heats up the surroundings are explained in the following.

There are many pros and few cons, in my opinion, when it comes to radiant heating. As for the pros, here are a few. It’s nearly silent, it’s clean, it’s comfortable, there are no ducts to clean, it’s efficient and requires minimal maintenance.

A major benefit in my opinion is the ability to zone your house. With a small amount of effort and some additional expense, you can have groups of rooms on their own zone. This allows you to have different zones different temperatures at different times. If you only use a few rooms in your home, you just can heat those rooms in that zone.

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Proper insulation, energy-efficient windows, doors, daylighting, shading, and ventilation are some ways that usually are enough to keep our homes, buildings, and establishments cool for the meantime, with a minimal use of energy.

In addition to intentional ventilation, air inevitably enters a building by the process of ‘air infiltration’. This is the uncontrolled flow of air into a space through adventitious or unintentional gaps and cracks in the building envelope. The corresponding loss of air from an enclosed space is termed ‘exfiltration’. The rate of air infiltration is dependent on the porosity of the building shell and the magnitude of the natural driving forces of wind and temperature. Vents and other openings incorporated into a building as part of ventilation design can also become routes for unintentional air flow when the pressures acting across such openings are dominated by weather conditions rather than intentionally (e.g. mechanically) induced driving forces.

Read full article at AIVC.

Ventilation might be some of the things we should avoid during hot, humid climates, but there are other approaches that can significantly reduce the need for a use of an air conditioning unit. From do-it-yourself cooling systems to other tips on staying cool without the need for an air conditioning unit, we’ve got you covered.

A simple fire in your fireplace may help in fueling radiant heat. An advantage this type of heating system has is that it does not give out dust or allergens because it takes away duct losses. It is much more efficient than other heating systems due to the way heat is distributed and unlike other heaters; this type of system does not heat up air, making it one of the best choices to consider in choosing an HVAC system.

To learn more about radiant heat systems, check this video out:

Other Resources:

Home Air Conditioner Guide for Beginners

Tips to Improve the Energy Efficiency of Your Home

Tuning Up HVAC Systems